The University of Arizona

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Improving Lives, Communities and the Economy

Pima Master Gardeners

  • How to Become a Pima County Master Gardener

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Pima County Master Gardeners are university-trained volunteers who serve as community educators. They work with the UA Cooperative Extension to provide researched-based information on environmentally responsible gardening and landscaping to the public.  Gardening questions, call the Plant Clinic 520-626-5161, Monday-Friday 8:30 am-4:30 pm

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What's Happening

How do plants survive 100+ degree temperatures?

Ask a Master Gardener at your local Tucson farmers' markets!

Ask a Master Gardener at your local Tucson farmers' markets!

Hear the history and heritage of Arizona's oldest University and its Arboretum.

What's hydroponics vs aquaponics?

Fruit and nut trees create sustainable, healthy communities.

How do plants survive 100+ degree temperatures?

Below is the spring schedule of the "Ask a Master Gardener" table at one of your local Tucson farmers' markets.

Proven techniques to help all your plants survive the 100+ degree temperatures.  Learn which plants are known to thrive in the heat.

Proven techniques to help all your plants survive the 100+ degree temperatures.  Learn which plants are known to thrive in the heat.

How do plants survive 100+ degree temperatures?

This tour features unique trees, native uses, and folklore.

Ask a Master Gardener at your local Tucson farmers' markets!

How do plants survive 100+ degree temperatures?

What's hydroponics vs aquaponics?

How do plants survive 100+ degree temperatures?

SAVE Saturday, October 7 for the Pima County Master Gardeners bi-annual plant sale!

Do you have a hori hori? Several Pima County Master Gardeners swear by them!

Pima County Master Gardeners | A new link has been shared | 1 day 17 hours ago

The University of Arizona Campus Arboretum Tree of the Week

Caesalpinia gilliesii, Yellow Bird of Paradise

This Tree of the Week is a highly heat tolerant plant and is blooming right now! Caesalpinia gilliesii, originally native to South America can now be found here in the desert southwest. Commonly known as Yellow Bird of Paradise, this fine textured shrub produces large clusters of intense yellow flowers with very conspicuous and long red stamens that extend beyond the floral petals. The shrubby tree reaches up to 6-10 ft tall, and produces small green leaflets and a slender trunk with open and upright branches.

The roots of this plant were used by indigenous medicine men in the Amazon as a cure for fevers, sores and coughs. The ripe seeds are poisonous though, so it's best planted in areas that where dogs and children are not at risk. Given careful consideration to plant it where it has access to adequate sun, and with regular pruning to modify its naturally open form into a more dense form, the Yellow Bird of Paradise makes an excellent ornamental plant in desert landscapes.

Pima County Master Gardeners | A new link has been shared | 1 day 17 hours ago

Did you know the National Phenology Network is housed at the University of Arizona?

Pima County Master Gardeners | A new link has been shared | 2 days 9 hours ago